6 Reason why your Baby is Crying and how to Stop it

Being a Mother is the most beautiful feeling as well as the most tiring one. We understand that sometimes it can get a bit tedious to handle but never giving up should be a mother’s motto. To make this journey of motherhood a tad bit easier, we bring to you a couple of reasons why your baby might be crying and how to stop it.

Hunger

This is probably the first thing you think of when your baby cries. As a new mother, learning to recognize the signs of hunger will help you in starting to feed your bundle of joy before the crying begins. A few signs your baby might be crying because he or she is hungry is when they make fuss, smack their lips, root (this is a newborn reflex that makes babies turn their head toward your hand when you stroke their cheek), and when they put their hands to their mouth.

Stomach problems from colic and gas

Doctors say that tummy troubles associated with gas or colic can lead to lots of crying. Usually known as colic, this condition is usually described as inconsolable crying for at least three hours a day, at least three days a week, at least three weeks in a row.

So, keep in mind that if your baby often fusses and cries right after being fed, he or she may have some sort of tummy pain. Many parents swear by over-the-counter anti-gas drops for babies or gripe water (made from herbs and sodium bicarbonate), though neither has been proven to be effective. We recommend that you get your doctor’s approval before using either of these.

Needs to burp

While burping isn’t mandatory, if your child keeps crying after feeding, a good burp may be all he or she needs. Babies swallow air when they breastfeed or suck from a bottle, and this may cause discomfort if the air isn’t released. Some babies are intensely bothered by having air in their tummy, while others don’t seem to burp or need to be burped much at all. So, next time you see your kid cry after a good feeding, this might be the reason.

Something painful that you don’t notice

You might be surprised to learn that babies can be really troubled by something as hard to spot as a hair wrapped tightly around a tiny toe or finger, cutting off circulation. (Doctors call this painful situation a “hair tourniquet,” and it’s one of the first things they look for if a baby seems to be crying for no reason.)

Some babies can be extra-sensitive to things like scratchy clothing tags or fabric. This is the reason they can be very picky (understandably) about subtleties ranging from the position they’re held in to the bottle you offer. So, you’ll have to be extra-vigilant.

Teething pain

Teething can be painful as each new tooth pushes through tender young gums. Some babies, unfortunately, suffer more than others, but all are likely to be fussy and tearful from teething at some point.

If your baby seems to be in pain and you’re not sure why, try feeling his or her gums with your finger. You may be surprised to discover the hard nub of an emerging baby tooth. (On average, the first tooth breaks through between 4 and 7 months, but it can happen earlier.)

Not feeling well

If you’ve met your baby’s basic needs and comforted him or her and he or she’s still crying, they could be coming down with something. You should check their temperature to rule out a fever and be alert for other signs of illness.

The cry of a sick baby tends to be distinct from one caused by hunger or frustration. If your baby’s crying just doesn’t sound “right,” trust your motherly instincts and call or see a doctor.

Apart from these reasons, a few other reasons why your child might be crying a lot are dirty diaper, too much or too less activity if it’s too cold or too hot and if they want to be held.

Keep in mind that babies have their own reasons why they’re crying. It’s just that they don’t have the words to tell us what’s wrong, and try as we might, even the wisest parents can’t read their baby’s mind. However, you can still comfort your baby, even if you don’t know why he’s upset.